Photo_by_Sriram_Bala.jpg
Tuvan throat singer from the Alash band. Photo by Sriram Bala and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial.
Throat Singing



Throat singing, also called overtone singing, may be the most well known aspect of the Altaic cultures. It is produced when the singer manipulates the resonances (or formants) created as air travels from the lungs, past the vocal folds, and out the lips to produce a melody. It is said to start in Tuva before spreading to nearby Mongolia and then to Central Asia. Out of the five Altaic branches ( Turkic, Mongolic, Tungusic, Korean, and Japonic) throat singing seams only to be popular with the Turkic and Mongolic branches. The most well known throat singing is right from throat singing's birthplace, Tuva. Throat singing is performed along side many traditional instruments like the two stringed Igil also called a horse head fiddle, Komus also called a Jew Harp, bells, drums, a chanzy (three string instrument played by plucking.), byzaanchy (which is like a the Igil but has four strings.), and the doshpuluur (Which like the chanzy is also played by plucking). When Mongolian throat sing they uses some of the same instruments as Tuvan which includes the Komus and the horse head fiddle (Which in Mongolian is called Morin khuur). However they have instruments different then the Tuvans which includes the yatga which is a Mongolian plucked zither. Mongolians mostly just use the Morin khuur and sometimes a Komus or drum when throat singing while the Tuvans while play up to eight instruments. In the past female throat singing has been a taboo but now days some women practice throat singing. [1]
Some imformation is from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overtone_singing
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuvan_throat_singing

Types of Ethnic Throat Singing

There is five differant stlyes in throat singing.

1. Sygyt
A high pitch sharp sound

Here is a demonstration of the sypt from Tuvan throat singing group Alash's website.
**http://www.alashensemble.com/QT_sygyt.htm**


2. Khoomei
An Airy whistle

Here is an demonstration of the khoomei from Tuvan throat singing group Alash's website.
hhttp://www.alashensemble.com/QT_xoomei.htm


3. Kargyraa
A low pitch sound

Here is an demonstration of the kargyraa from Tuvan throat singing group Alash's website.
http://www.alashensemble.com/QT_kargyraa.htm


4. Borbangnadyr
A rolling sound

Here is an demonstration of the borbangnadyr from Tuvan throat singing group Alash's website.
**http://www.alashensemble.com/QT_borbangnadyr.htm**


5. Ezenggileer
A rhythmic sound.

Here is an demonstration of the ezenggileer from Tuvan throat singing group Alash's website.
**http://www.alashensemble.com/QT_ezenggileer.htm**



Learn more about the five stlyes here:
**http://www.alashensemble.com/about_tts.htm**


Other Altaic Throat Singing


Tuvan and Mongolian seem to be the best known of the Altaic throat singing traditions. However there is other less known throat singing traditions. Like Khakas and Kazakh. The Tungusic Nanais practice throat singing however throat singing is rare in Tungusic cultures.

Samples

Tuvan Throat Singing
Tuvan Male Throat Singing Sample
Tuvan Female Throat Singing Sample
Tuvan Throat Singing Sample
Tuvan Throat Singing Sample

Altay Throat Singing
Altay Throat Singing Sample
Altay Throat Singing Sample

Khakas Throat Singing
Khakas Throat Singing Sample

Mongolian Throat Singing
Mongolian Throat Singing Sample

Kalmyk Throat Singing
Kalmyk Throat Singing Sample

Buryat Throat Singing
Buryat Throat Singing Sample

Kazakh Throat Singing
Kazakh Throat Singing Sample

Nanai Throat Singing
Nanai Throat Singing Sample



Throat Singing Groups


Throat singing has been made famous around the world by many wonderful folklore groups. A well known group is the Tuvan group Huun Huur.
Tuvan Throat Singing Group "Alash"
Tuvan Groups

Huun Huur Tu
Chirgilchin
Alash

Altay Throat Sing Group "Altai Kai"
Altay Groups

Altai Kai


Mongolian band "Hanggai"
Mongolian Groups

Hanggai





(Will Update)